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My Guitars
This one is a Paul Lloret original design, handmade by him, a fairly deep semihollow archtop with a spruce top,
curly maple back, sides, and neck, an ebony fretboard, and two hot Schaller humbucker pickups.  This is a fairly
unique design... it is like a Gibson ES-335 in that there is a solid block down the center of the body into which the
pickups and bridge are mounted,  but it is unlike any other guitar I know of in that the center block does not go all
the way through the body. The back floats free of the center block, making this a truly-hollow-semi-hollow archtop.  
This guitar oozes tone!  It is a one-off, completely handmade guitar from the shop of my father-in-law.  He made it
in 1999 or 2000 I think.
And here is my 1988 Fender American
Standard Telecaster.  Made in USA, gorgeous
sunburst finish, which is a bit more brown
around the edges than the black the picture
shows.  It fits me like a glove and is rock
solid... you can feel when a guitar is well made
and this one is.  I breifly owned a
Japanese-made Tele before trading it for this
one and though it wasn't a bad instrument this
one beats the pants off it.  
And it's much better
still since I upgraded the pups with Seymour
Duncan Antiquiy '55s!  
The bridge pickup is
hot and sharp, with that distinctive Tele quack;
the neck pickup is mellow, and when I set the
switch for both pickups and put the tone at 5
it's heaven, baby. I upgraded the bridge with
an aftermarket model by Callaham, which has
a much thicker steel plate and three
compensated brass saddles replacing the six
steel saddles on the original bridge.  Much
more of a classic Tele vibe.  The American
Standard bridge differs from the 'normal' tele
bridge in that it lacks the lip around the edge
and it extends farther back.
And here is my cheapo Korean Fender Squier
bass, which I improved dramatically by having
the neck worked on (straightened) and
replacing the pickups with (evenutally) Fender
pickups.  I rarely play bass (I got it for
recording) and I have never have had a bass
amplifier, so I don't really know how it sounds
to tell you the truth, and I've had it for years
and years.  Maybe I'll take it on a field trip one
day and see.
...and I've had this Tele for over 20 years.  Here
it is along with my first Gibson ES335 in my
closet (literally) recording studio in
Philadelphia c. 1990.  A couple of years later I
sold the Gibson, alas, to raise some money to
buy my first woodworking tools.  That's my
Fender Super Reverb amp in the bottom right
corner, which I also eventually sold.
This Les Paul I made myself between
September 2003 and January 2004.  From
scratch, baby.  It's a sweet guitar!  Beautiful
thick sound, good action, killer looks (if I do
say so myself).  I just keep looking at it.. I
can't believe I made it.  Lots more pictures of
it as well as construction details
HERE.
And here's the back... I think a beautiful
back on a guitar is sort of hedonistic... if
you're playing it, no one can see it of course,
so it's just your little luxurious secret.
2000 Gibson ES-335.  I love
this guitar.  I had one from
1988 to 1992 or so and sold it
in a way that I instantly
regretted. I pined and pined
for it and eventually I caved
to my longing and picked this
one up.  It runs rings around
the various Epiphones with
which I had tried to feed my
jones
.
Classical guitar, Casa Villafan,
Paracho Mexico.  This is a Mexican
guitar from a very prolific
guitar-making town.  My father
bought this guitar so I don't know
much about it.  I am fairly certain
it's handmade, and not super-high
quality.  I replaced the tuning
machines.  My ear for classical
guitars is absent, so I can't even
really say how good it sounds.  It
does sound like a classical guitar,
though.
This is the first acoustic guitar I built.  It's made on a
Martin OM plan. Top is Sitka spruce, back and sides are
mahogany.  Brazilian rosewood fingerboard and bridge,
maple binding. It came out really well for my first
acoustic, but there's plenty of room for improvement when
I make my next one!   Some details about building this
sucker are
HERE.
HOME
Build Archtop page 1
Build Archtop page 3
And this is my second acoustic build.  It's a 000 style.  It
has a slot peghead and the neck/body join is at the 12th
fret instead of the more common 14th fret.  I purposefully
built it lighter than the OM and that plus the larger body
gives it a very nice deep bell-like tone.  This one came out
really well.  Details
HERE.